Mutation & Hatching/handraising Question that people have as Mick.

Question by a Rhys Wailes

hi
i saw your website and noticed you specialised in mutation lorikeets so i was just wandering whether you could answer this question for me:
i currently own a pair of scaly breasted lorikeets. The hen is a pure lutino and the cock bird is a split lutino. What coloured chicks would they produce?
thanks heaps
rhys

Mick Reply to Rhys

Hi Rhys

As long as your lutino hen is not mask grey-green, than this will be what you will get

Male Genotype: Normal, Split Lutino (normal green /lutino)

Female Genotype: Lutino

25.0% Male - Lutino
25.0% Male - Normal, Split Lutino
25.0% Female - Lutino
25.0% Female - Normal

If your Lutino (yellow) hen is masking SF (single factor) grey-green than this will be what you will get.

Male Genotype: Normal, Split Lutino

Female Genotype: Lutino, masking(SF) Grey-green

12.5% Male - Lutino
12.5% Male - Normal, Split Lutino
12.5% Male - Lutino, masking(SF) Grey-green
12.5% Male - (SF) Grey-green, Split Lutino

12.5% Female - Lutino
12.5% Female - Normal
12.5% Female - Lutino, masking(SF) Grey-green
12.5% Female - (SF) Grey-green

Please note that you can not tell the normal Lutino from the Lutino masking grey-green

If your Lutino (yellow) hen is masking DF ( double factor) grey-green than this will be what you will get.


Male Genotype: Normal, Split Lutino

Female Genotype: Lutino, Masking DF Grey-green


25% Male - Lutino, Masking (SF) Grey-green
25% Male - (SF) Grey-green, Split Lutino

25% Female - Lutino, Masking (SF) Grey-green
25% Female - (SF) Grey-green

Please note that you can not tell the normal Lutino from the Lutino masking grey-green

Please note that Grey-green is a grey factor, and is the colour that people call incorrectly an Olive Scaly.

Hope this has helped you out.

Mick
Mick& Karin Blake
Owners & Managers of
Karmic Aviaries,
Karmicmon Catering & Pizza Oven Hire
One Stack Pottery & Basilisk Gallery
Mt Morgan Queensland
Australia.
www.karmicaviaries.com

Question #2

Hi ,
Can the baby really go 72 house between internal and external pip. I've read that some species can go 72 hours from internal pip to actual hatch, but to just get to external pip in that amout of time seems like a long time. Also, if one puts a hole in the air sac (and I not debating whether it is right of wrong) how does the baby deplete the oxygen supply and cause convulsions to break the egg with the egg tooth. Once I put a hole in an egg's air sac, I pretty much figure that I'll eventually be going in for an assist. I'm not saying my way is the right way, I'm just curious.

Regards,
Pat

Anwser #2

Hi Pat & Rei,

I have seen a huge different with in species in hatching times, I tend to not interfere these day with hatching chicks, I have some chicks take 4 full days from internal pip to fully out and yes these chick take up to at least 72 hours to externally pip. but in saying this I have seen in the same species chicks that go from internal pip to fully out in around six hour and these chicks are in a hurry for what ever reason I'm not sure off. 20 + years ago we would be helping 1 :10 chicks were assisted hatchings. nowadays my assistance ratio is around 1:100 chicks ,

I find nowadays that we have two designated hatchers set up and waiting for eggs to draw down and in they go, I have now disciplined myself enough that I'm not open the Hatcher every hour checking on what is happening . I now only check twice a day, I tend to let the chicks do their stuff in peace and quite. As each time you open the Hatcher there is a rush of dry cold air that rush across the internal membrane drying it out, this will happen even if the chick has not externally pips as the egg shell is very affiance in letting air in to the air sack. If the chick has just got this head out in to the airsack the membrane will dry out and even stick to the chick's head /face and then the chick is unable to hatch un assisted. I have two Hatcher for a good reason as if I have eggs that are in the mid to late stages of hatching in the one Hatcher then I do not have to disturb them and I can set up the eggs in the second Hatcher. both hatchers are set the same, 36.2ºc which is one degree colder than the incubator and between 65% and 85% RH. this works for us.

I tend to think nowadays that if I give the egg/chick the absolute best environment to hatch in, well then it all up to the chick, I find that 99% of problem hatchings are man made ones, But we as humans always blame the chick first.

Hope this helps.

Mick
Mick& Karin Blake
Owners & Managers of
Karmic Aviaries,
Mon-Mic-Kar Catering & Pizza Oven Hire
One Stack Pottery & Basilisk Gallery
Mt Morgan Queensland
Australia.
www.karmicaviaries.com

Anwers to my reply Question #2

Priceless!.....Indeed has helped!.....Wow....this hands on experience incredibly enlightening for me as well...makes awesome great sense....thanks Mick...is one of those written statements I have read it over and over again and comprehend something new every time....amazing how everyone applies their skills on the subject of Artificial Incubation....
Rei

 

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Mutation Lorikeets
at Karmic Aviaries

 

 

 

At Karmic Aviaries we keep and breed a range of parrots. But the one group that get the most comments are for the members of the Loriinae family in which we have kept any species of Exotic Lorries but have now specialized in mutation Rainbows Lorikeets in

Green & Yellow Pied, Olive & Buttercup Pieds(Grey-green pieds), Lutino

PLUS Lutino Scaly's

 

We are NOT OPEN to the General Public

This means we are a closed flock Facility and for Quarantine purpose only visitor allowed by Appointment.


 
 
 

 

Our Lorikeet diet here at Karmic Aviaries

Fruit and Veggies we feed the lorikeets -Bananas, cucumbers, apple, silver beet, capsicum, orange, peaches, pears, grapes,

mango, paw paw, passion fruit, rock melon, celery, cherry tomatoes, carrots, pumpkin, zucchini,

broccoli, corn, peas and sprouted seed about a tablespoon mixed through the mix. 

They receive about a 1/4 of a cup each day when not breeding and as much as required when breeding. 

They also receive about 2 or 3 slices of apple in the afternoon. 

When breeding the amount of apple is also increased.

Nectar  Mix

 Ingredients

1          packet Heinz High Protein Cereal ™.

1/2       cup dextrose (sugar supplement)

1/2       cup Maltogen (available from chemist) ™.

1/4       cup raw sugar

1/2       cup good quality skim milk powder

Heaped teaspoon Avian Vitamin/Mineral Supplement

Dry  Mix

Ingredients

2          cups Heinz Rice Cereal  ™

2          cups Rice Flour

2          cups Egg and Biscuit

1          cup dextrose

1          teaspoon Avian Multi-vitamin power

1/4       cup Sustagen Gold (French Vanilla Flavor)™.

1          tablespoon Natural Powdered Brewers' Yeast (Cenovis) ™.

1          Tablespoon Calcium powder (complete). ™.

 

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